vp19 (vp19) wrote in carole_and_co,
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Next April, get pre-Code(d)



Carole Lombard, aka New York streetwalker "Mae," begins her exile to Danbury, Conn., after being convicted on a Manhattan morals charge. But she decides to instead exit at 125th Street -- not to ply her trade again, but to make a new start in the big city. She eventually does, with some hardships along the way, in "Virtue," a tough 1932 drama for Columbia.

It's probably the closest Carole ever came to what might be deemed the classic "pre-Code" style. Think "Baby Face" (1933) with Barbara Stanwyck (and Theresa Harris)...



..."Red Dust" (1932), with Jean Harlow and Clark Gable...



...or "Safe In Hell" (1931) with Dorothy Mackaill:



Now these and other once-suppressed gems from the early '30s are to be examined in a book coming out next spring, written by Facebook friend Mark A. Vieira.



As you can see, it also has the Turner Classic Movies imprimatur. This press release adds more information:



While I earlier stated Lombard isn't perceived as a prime pre-Code subject unlike Stanwyck, Harlow, Mackaill, Norma Shearer, Marlene Dietrich, Joan Blondell or Loretta Young, she isn't ignored by Vieira. He sent this listing in the index...



...as well as this pic of Carole with John Barrymore for "Twentieth Century," when pre-Code and screwball comedy briefly overlapped...



Vieira added that while "Forbidden Hollywood" will hit bookstores April 2, "it can be pre-ordered now from Amazon.com, which means it might arrive in mid-March, Never can tell."

To pre-order, visit https://www.amazon.com/Forbidden-Hollywood-Pre-Code-1930-1934-Classic/dp/0762466774. Carole, Loretta (shown below in 1933's "She Had To Say Yes") and all the pre-Code legends look forward to meeting you.

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