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A lot of 'Allure' (and Lombard) to show you



Did Carole Lombard have plenty of sex appeal? That photo of her in a swimsuit, from the June 1932 issue of Modern Screen, supplies an obvious answer (https://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/817111.html). Half a decade later, Carole still possessed the power to make men melt.

Don't believe me? I'll give you visual proof; she's featured in Allure magazine. No, not the current Conde Nast beauty publication (below is its February 2018 cover with Dakota Johnson)...



...nope, this magazine titled Allure was published more than eight decades ago, and in fact we've written about it before (https://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/172877.html).



Then as now, we're reporting it in the context of an eBay auction (more on that later). However, unlike our 2009 entry, not only do we know more about the publication, but we have more examples to show you. Above is the cover of that inaugural issue, July 1937, and Lombard -- nearing the apex of her popularity -- is inside, having won an award from the magazine:



We ran that two-page display -- chock full of "leg art," the last time, in much smaller form. As you can tell, this is the 1937 equivalent of a "girlie" mag, dedicated to showing the female form in as much of its glory as postal inspectors would allow.

Here's more from that first issue, starting with the table of contents:



There's a display called "Sitdowners"; labor strikes were a big deal in '37, and the mag borrowed the term to show off some leggy ladies, followed by some more pages:




Even a drawing has a reference to a "sit-down strike":







The swimwear Lombard exhibited earlier in the issue has some more examples ("Sun-Kissed Peaches Of The Beaches"):



And look at lovely young Ida Lupino:



Carole's Paramount pal Dorothy Lamour, already famed for her sarong, was Allure's cover subject in August (Marlene Dietrich was that month's award-winner), while another issue made newsstands in September:




Reader Paul Duca commented in 2009, "Obviously it didn't last too long then...otherwise Moss Hart wouldn't have used Allure as the name of the fashion magazine that was the setting for the musical 'Lady In The Dark' (he wrote the libretto)."

And Paul was right. (BTW, Gertrude Lawrence starred in it on Broadway, while Ginger Rogers had the lady in a 1944 film version directed by Mitchell Leisen.) The three issues represented the complete run for this Allure.

This July issue, which the seller accurately describes as a "spicy pulp era girlie magazine," is in very good condition. It's complete with no cut or missing pages, an some scattered surface wear.

One bid, for $4.95, has been made as of this writing; the auction is set to close at 9:39 p.m. (Eastern) June 11 (a week from Monday). Like to get your hands on this Lombard rarity? Then visit https://www.ebay.com/itm/Complete-July-1937-Vol-1-No-1-Allure-Magazine-Carole-Lombard-Pin-Up-Photos/292586508924?hash=item441f83d27c:g:CZ8AAOSwT4ZbEBkl#viTabs_0.
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