vp19 (vp19) wrote in carole_and_co,
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Preparing for a character study, and welcome back, 'Mom'



Nearly four years ago, I took part in the "What A Character!" blogathon, providing an entry on Walter Connolly, shown standing over Carole Lombard and Lyle Talbot in 1932's "No More Orchids" (http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/647552.html). Next month, the blogathon returns for its sixth edition:



This year, it's hosted by Once Upon A Screen (https://aurorasginjoint.com), Outspoken And Freckled (https://kelleepratt.com/) and Paula's Cinema Club (https://paulascinemaclub.com/).

As of this writing, 20 blogs have agreed to participate, writing about fine character actors from film and TV such as Agnes Moorehead, Mary Wickes and William Schallert. My subject will of course be someone who worked on screen with Carole; for now that's all I'll say. Stay tuned.

Speaking of TV, my favorite current sitcom returns for its fifth season tonight:



Since its second season three years ago, "Mom" has been a late entry to premieres because CBS, which carries the show, airs it on Thursdays -- the night the network airs early-season NFL games. (You remember the NFL, right?) That's over with (congratulations to the Houston Astros for winning their first World Series, BTW), and CBS can now unveil its Thursday prime-time schedule.

In the past, such delays pained "Mom" fans such as myself...but not this year. In September, the series began airing in syndication, and sitcom king Chuck Lorre made sure it's seen all over the place: local affiliates, such as KDOC here in Los Angeles, cable networks TV Land and FXX, and Hulu's streaming service. You seemingly can't escape Christy and Bonnie Plunkett as two generations of recovering substance abusers. (Pretty remarkable for longtime fans, considering "Mom" came close to not being renewed after its first season.)



That in itself doesn't sound funny, but the well-written "Mom" blends humor with heart. Above, Christy (Anna Faris) talks with her support friend Marjorie (Mimi Kennedy, a Lorre favorite since her time on "Dharma & Greg"). The series has explored homelessness, economic struggles, sexual abuse and other weighty issues, balancing them with laughs. It's probably the closest Lorre has come to a Norman Lear type of sitcom. (I previously wrote about the series at http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/742075.html.)

Its rerun exposure this fall has probably won it new fans, and I hope you're one of them. I invite you to check out the season premiere tonight.
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