vp19 (vp19) wrote in carole_and_co,
vp19
vp19
carole_and_co

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All sorts of happy stuff



To borrow a line from the Harold Arlen song, forget your troubles and just get happy. If you're in the Northern Hemisphere, spring is here; if you're in North America, baseball season has begun; and if you're a Carole Lombard fan, I have some more long-lost treasures, courtesy of Tally Haugen and her new batch of Lombard goodies. Seeing these made me happy, and they should have a similar effect on you.

In fact, we'll kick things off with an item entitled "Found -- A Happy Star":



About the only things that could make me happier about this article would be finding it in its entirety, and discovering when and where it was published (I'm guessing it to be from 1932 or '33). A Google search under "found a happy star" yielded no success (though I did get the locations of several "Happy Star" Chinese restaurants!), and looking under the name of the "as told to" writer, Dorothy Wooldridge, proved similarly unfruitful -- but I did come up with this photo of her:



It's from 1926, on the set of Warners' "Across The Pacific," and the "native" girl alongside Wooldridge is none other than a young (and fabulous-looking) Myrna Loy.

Here's another "happy" story; in fact, it concerns "Two Happy People," namely Lombard and Clark Gable. Its author is James Street, who may well be the James H. Street whose story "Letter To The Editor" was the genesis for Lombard's hit "Nothing Sacred," and it's from Movie And Radio Guide of May 11, 1940:




Is the title, "Two Happy People," a take-off on the name of a current hit of the time, "Two Sleepy People"? An intriguing piece, and alas, another incomplete one.

We'll stay with Clark and Carole, and in fact get a pictorial of life on the ranch in "At Home With The Gables." Ida Zeitlin wrote this for Picture Play in August 1940, and again, it's incomplete:




We'll close by wishing a happy 89th birthday to a legend of both music and movies, the great Doris Day. Here's my favorite record of hers, a 1947 version of the old ballad "Pretty Baby." This is the only sample of the song on YouTube, taken from a 78 rpm recording (it can be found on many of Day's CD greatest hits compilations, in far better sound quality). Love the arrangement by George Siravo, and Doris sings this beautifully and sensually -- as close to a sexy lullaby as you're going to get.

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