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carole lombard 05

Break on through to the Other Side

Posted by vp19 on 2011.02.25 at 01:48
Current mood: calmcalm


Ever wonder what Carole Lombard and Clark Gable are up to these days? That's right, I said "these days."

No, I have not been partaking of any controlled substances, nor have I suffered a bump on my head that leads me to believe I'm in 1940. Yes, I know Lombard hasn't been with us for nearly 70 years, and that Gable has been gone for more than half a century. But that's here where they're in the past tense; there could be a "there" where they live on.

And a best-selling author believes she's tracked them down. Ladies and gentlemen, may I present the latest offering from noted psychic Sylvia Browne:



"Afterlives Of The Rich And Famous" was released earlier this month by HarperCollins, and according to Browne, Clark and Carole were the impetus behind this book:

"It was very strange. One night I was lying in bed and I was thinking about Clark Gable and his love affair with Carole Lombard. I asked my spirit guide (Francine) if they ever got together, and she said that they're very much in love 'over here.' When she says 'over here,' she means the Other Side. They rowboat together, they walk together."



But do they hunt together? (That's Clark and Carole from their 1941 trip to South Dakota.) Perhaps on that astral plane, the pheasants feel no pain. (The preceding sentence is arguably the weirdest one I've ever written.)

And Browne says the afterlife has no clouds or harps:

"In actuality, the afterlife is 3 feet above our ground level. People keep looking up to the sky -– which isn't correct. When people see 'ghosts,' they always say they're floating. They're not actually floating, they're walking on their own solid ground. It has libraries, it has record centers, it has concert halls, it has everything except the negativity."

Three feet off the ground? I guess that means anyone who found a way to visually experience both planes simultaneously would be eye level to all sorts of afterlife kneecaps.

I haven't come across the book yet, but online there are some snippets of references to Lombard (I'm not sure whether she's one of the 40 celebrities profiled or merely mentioned as an adjunct to Gable):

* On page 206, it says one celebrity, whose identity I can't immediately discern, is "performing with an unending series of plays, particularly with her old friends Laurence Olivier and Carole Lombard." (Has the afterlife Lombard suddenly developed a hankering for the theatre? If so, the afterlife Broadway and West End are in for a treat.)

* On page 248, there is a reference to "high-spirited, outspoken actress Carole Lombard. Legend has it that it was Carole Lombard who first suggested the idea of Clark Gable for..." (I'm pretty sure this refers to Rhett Butler, all you "Gone With The Wind" fans.)

* The facing page, 249, has this: "It was January 16, 1942, three years into this marriage of kindred souls. Carole Lombard had just finished her film 'To Be Or Not To Be' and boarded TWA Flight 3..." Alas, we know the rest.

* Finally, this from page 251: "...at rest beside the body of Carole Lombard, where he'd yearned to be for so many years. From Francine: The first face he saw when he arrived Home..."

Anyone here bought or seen the book? I'd be fascinated to learn more about how Browne and Francine envision the afterlives of Carole and Clark.

The subjects profiled in this book include the usual suspects -- Marilyn Monroe, Beatles John Lennon and George Harrison, Princess Diana, Michael Jackson, Heath Ledger and Anna Nicole Smith, subject of a recent opera (yes, opera) in London:



But there are some celebrities who one might be surprised to find, such as veteran newsman Walter Cronkite and comedian George Carlin, known for his skepticism regarding organized religion. I've seen part of Carlin's afterlife description, and it's pretty interesting. According to Browne's conduit, Francine:

"I wish you could have seen the look of shock on George's face when he emerged from the tunnel and discovered there really is life after death after all. And when he found his first wife, Brenda, waiting to greet him, he was stunned into a long silence while he held her, after which I'm told he gaped at the hundreds of spirits and animals who gathered for the reunion and said, 'I'll be damned.'"

After which I fully expected that a loud voice -- maybe resembling Bill Cosby's Almighty in his famous "Noah" routine -- would tell Carlin, "No, you won't." Because, to borrow the title of an Elvis Costello song, God's comic.

Sounds like a fun read, no matter what your views on the hereafter -- even if when you hear the name "Jean Dixon," you don't think of the psychic (didn't her first name have an "e," a la Lombard?), but the fine, unrelated character actress who portrayed the maid in "My Man Godfrey":


Comments:


lefalcone at 2011-02-25 13:28 (UTC) (Link)
I cataloged the book at work. Meh. It's corny. One thing that caught my eye about Carole was that supposedly she turned a blind eye to Clark's many affairs. Huh? Did she? Other than that, I thought it rather disrespectful but I'm weird that way.
cinemafan2 at 2011-02-26 17:57 (UTC) (Link)

Turning a blind eye to Clark's affairs?

My understanding is that Carole put up with Gable's indiscriminate sex with script girls and hat check girls because she knew the nature of her man. But she drew the line at his romancing of his female co-stars. Allegedly they had a huge row the night before she left on the war bond tour over what she saw as his buddying affair with Lana Turner. (Of course Miss Turner, who ultimately married eight times and had countless affairs, denied all....) Whether they ever touched base by phone during the war bond tour and "kissed and made up" is an open question.

When she left on the war bond tour she had never been away from Gable for more than a day or so since they were married -- possibly because she didn't trust him when left on his own. She actually aborted the war bond tour after the first rally in Indianapolis and flew home. Tragically the result was her death.

Bill


Edited at 2011-02-27 06:04 am (UTC)
vp19
vp19 at 2011-02-27 07:00 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Turning a blind eye to Clark's affairs?

Bill, I don't mind your comments per se...however, I am getting the same message repeatedly e-mailed to me three or four times, and frankly, it's getting annoying. Please find a way to stop this.
cinemafan2 at 2011-02-27 07:34 (UTC) (Link)

Re: Turning a blind eye to Clark's affairs?

Must be because I edit it. Sorry it annoys you.
(Anonymous) at 2011-02-25 19:08 (UTC) (Link)

Getting into the spirit of things

I'm surprised the book didn't have a ghost writer. Ahem. --Mark from Michigan
bakebaker at 2011-02-26 04:12 (UTC) (Link)

1 other book I recall..

Tho I cant recall the title, it centered around the afterlife of Judy Garland. Too strange it was, but I DO recall a mention of Gable & Lombard by a swimming pool, looking gorgeous.. (I had an "Aunt Ruth" who was into these things.She was a nice, "flapper" from the 1920s,belived in a person's "aura", etc.. she drew looks sometimes talking about this stuff, BUT was the first lady who ever talked to me like I had something to say! Nice gal!)
Anyway, I say ya never know! The "ultimate myserty" none of us know until its upon us. Good ol "Syl" MAY have an interesting book; Id read it!
Tal
cinemafan2 at 2011-02-26 16:28 (UTC) (Link)

What are Clark and Kay doing?

Wouldn't this be a more appropriate question?

Bill
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